30th April 2017 - 13 Years of Pub Fest!

 

The CITY of Maryborough

Walk beautifully preserved colonial streets once the home of merchant banks and opium dens, and soak up the history and heritage architecture of what was once one was one of Australia’s largest and busiest ports.
Settled in 1847, Maryborough's fascinating past is easily recognisable in its gloriously preserved colonial architecture, magnificent riverside parks, heritage characters, unique events and quirky heritage tours.

Laughter and astonished exclamations have echoed from the walls of Maryborough's pubs for more than 160 years.

A walk around Maryborough's CBD reveals many former hotels now operating as shops, restaurants and other businesses.
Their days as hotels are long gone, but their history and architectural charm lives on...

For information on what to see and do, visit http://www.visitfrasercoast.com/destinations/maryborough or call in and have a chat with the friendly staff and volunteers at the Visitor Information Centre in City Hall - look for the Clock Tower flying the Australian Flag!

 

 

PUBS WITH A PAST

A walk around Maryborough's CBD reveals many former hotels now operating as shops, restaurants and other businesses. Their days as hotels are long gone, but their history and architectural charm lives on...

Queens
Corner of Kent and Adelaide Streets
After the original hotel was lost in the 1876 fire, this building went up in 1883. It was closed as a hotel in mid 1990s

Francis 
Corner of Kent and Richmond Streets.
The hotel is the site of the first hotel built in the new township in 1853. The lower storey was built in 1878 and named the Metropolitan.  A second storey was added after the First World War and was re-named the Francis in the 1930s.

Royal
Corner of Kent and Bazaar Streets.
Completed in 1902, for many years this was the leading hostelry in Maryborough with its grand foyer and staircase. It replaced an earlier two storey wooden hotel first called the Bush Inn built in 1858, and renamed the Royal in 1863.

Engineers Arms
Corner of March and Bowen Streets. 
Reminiscent of early pubs in Sydney, this former hotel was built in the 1889 to suit the wedge shaped block replacing an earlier wooden hotel c.1865. It is rumoured to be haunted by members of the tragic Dillane family. Husband Thomas died seven years after taking over the hotel in 1870, followed by his daughter, 11 years, and son aged 17. Wife Anne continued as publican until she too died in the city's worst flood of 1893. Remaining son Michael died the following year.

European
239-245 Adelaide Street.
Built in 1884, it replaced an earlier hotel of the same name which had its own brewery at the rear. It closed in 1950 and was converted into shops.

Great Western / Civic
Ramsay Place, Lennox Street. 
Built 1887 across from the railway station the hotel was named to acknowledge the work of opening up the Western Railway Line. Its name was change to the Civic in 1959 and it closed in 1991.